Skip to main content

Principles and Practices of Teaching Young Children (CLDDV 101: Osburn): Cite Your Sources

Use this guide for your research paper on Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Positive Discipline.

Avoid Plagiarism

Whether you mean to do it or not, plagiarism is stealing. This brief video from Eastern Gateway Community College explains plagiarism and shows you ways you can avoid it.


Plagiarism does not apply only to written works; it also applies to images, graphics, charts, music, videos, etc. that you use in your research.

This form of Academic dishonesty applies to individual as well as group work and may result in partial credit, no credit, or failure of the exam or assignment. In addition, your instructor may forward the situation to the Office of Student Success for further disciplinary action such as suspension or removal from the course or college in accordance with the YCCD Board Policy and Procedure 5500: Standards of Student Conduct.

How citing your sources affects your paper

Citation Styles

Your instructor should tell you which citation style he or she wants you to use. Click on the appropriate link below to learn how to format your paper and cite your sources according to a particular style.

Cite Successfully

To cite sources successfully, it's crucial you have a clear understanding of:

  1. The TYPE of source you're using (magazine article vs. book vs. reference book article)
  2. The PLACE where you found that source (in print at the library vs. online via a database vs. online via a Web site). 
  3. The source's full "bibliographic information" (authors/editors, title, edition, publisher, pages, etc.)

The citation style you use will affect your paper in three places:

  • The general format of the paper. This includes margins, font, page numbers, line spacing, titles, headings, etc.
     
  • The bibliography. The bibliography is the cumulative list of all sources used in your research. In MLA, this is called the Works Cited list; in APA it's called References, and in Chicago it's called Reference List. 
     
  • In-text citation. Citing sources within the body of your paper let's your reader know you are incorporating someone else's words/research/ideas.